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Statewide Ban on Salary History Questions To Take Effect

Photo by energepic.com from PexelsOn October 12, 2017, Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 168 into law. This new law, which applies to all employers regardless of size, prohibits inquiries into an applicant’s salary history. In addition, employers will now also be required to disclose the relevant pay scale for an open position upon reasonable request. There are a few exceptions to the new law. Employers may consider salary history information that is “disclosable to the public pursuant to federal and state law,” as well as salary history information that is disclosed by an applicant “voluntarily and without prompting.”

The new law goes into effect on January 1, 2018. In the interim, employers should review their hiring practices for compliance and should consider revisions to all aspects of their recruitment process, including but not limited to job postings, applications, and interview questions.

Will Klatte on looking past the billable hour in JD Supra article

MAY 2017 – Will Klatte was quoted on JD Supra, a leading distributor of legal news and analysis, in an article exploring how law firms are innovating to increase efficiency. He discussed KBY Law’s adaptability and willingness to look beyond billable hours to improve the services provided to clients. The article can be viewed here.

New California Regulations on Transgender Identity and Expression Take Effect

Under California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), employers may not discriminate on the basis of the gender identity or gender expression of an employee or applicant. On July 1, 2017, newly amended California FEHA regulations on transgender identity and expression (which can be found here) took effect, specifically interpreting and expanding upon protections for transgender employees in a number of ways, including the following:Continue reading

Summer Young-Agriesti and Ana Thomas obtain summary judgment as to all causes of action in discrimination case

MARCH 2017 – Los Angeles Superior Court. Obtained Summary Judgment on behalf of large hospital management corporation as to all seven causes of action asserted against it.  The complaint asserted race discrimination, harassment and retaliation claims in downtown Los Angeles, which is one of the most liberal jury pools in the country.  Prevailing party costs of approximately $15,000 were obtained.

Joe Naddour speaks at California Minority Counsel Program panel in San Francisco

NOVEMBER 2016 – KBY Law attorneys recently attended the California Minority Counsel Program’s Annual Business Conference in San Francisco.  Joe Naddour, who serves on CMCP’s Ambassador’s Council, spoke at a panel entitled “Is Work Life Balance a Myth? Finding the Right Position and the Right State of Mind.”  KBY Law is proud to support CMCP’s mission to promote diversity in the legal profession.

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The California Supreme Court Clarifies Suitable Seating

In a highly anticipated ruling, the California Supreme Court recently answered three questions certified to it by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of Kilby v. CVS Pharmacy Inc. The questions related to Section 14 of California Industrial Welfare Commission (“IWC”) Wage Orders 4-2001 and 7-2001, which provide that “employees shall be provided with suitable seats when the nature of the work reasonably permits the use of seats.”

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